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As a travel photographer, skylines are always on my list of subjects to photograph wherever I go. Images of skylines are the “establishing” shot in a collection of pictures; they inform the viewer as to the general, big-picture character of a place. And whether a skyline features sleek, modern buildings like Chicago, Illinois or more historic architecture like Edinburgh, Scotland they are frequently included in magazine stories and in demand at stock agencies. Here are three tips for taking a winning skyline shot: 1. Shoot locally, first. Even if you have little experience photographing skylines, you still have an advantage over more-experienced out-of-towners when it comes to your own backyard. Living in a particular city allows you to scout for the perfect location and wait for the right moment before taking your skyline pictures. Local skylines are also the perfect subject to hone your skills before spending time and money travelling to other locations. 2. Make the shot special. Look for interesting angles, reflections, or anything that might make your shot a little different than the rest. For this Edinburgh image, for example, I walked up to Calton Hill, south of the city, and framed the shot using the multi-columned structure (the Stewart Monument) as the foreground. And in this Chicago shot, I used the famous Cloud Gate sculpture (known locally as “The Bean”) like a fun-house mirror to reflect the adjacent skyline. 3. Use a tripod. Stock agencies receive many images of skylines, and only the best make the cut. Increase your chances of having your images selected by using a tripod. Tripods produce tack-sharp images and allow you to carefully compose a subject before pressing the shutter. [Editor’s Note: Learn more about how you can turn your pictures into cash in our free online newsletter The Right Way to Travel.  Sign up here today and we’ll send you a new report, Selling Photos for Cash: A Quick-Start Guide, completely FREE.]

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