The opposite of success isn’t failure. To fail means at least you tried. And you got new information that will help you succeed when you try again. No, the opposite of success is never trying. Take a look at these three photos, for example: three-failures I might be inclined to call them “failures,” if I didn’t know that they led to this final shot: successes- Bonnie, here. I’m a perfectionist. And on this particular day, I was experimenting with light and trying to create a photograph that said something more than: “Look, I’m experimenting with light.” My fear of doing things wrong has stopped me from trying a lot of things with my photography. But this story, from the book “Art and Fear,” changed my outlook. If you’re at all like me, maybe it’ll help you, too: The ceramics teacher announced on opening day that he was dividing the class into two groups. All those on the left side of the studio, he said, would be graded solely on the quantity of work they produced, all those on the right solely on its quality.  His procedure was simple: on the final day of class he would bring in his bathroom scales and weigh the work of the “quantity” group: fifty pounds of pots rated an “A”, forty pounds a “B”, and so on. Those being graded on “quality”, however, needed to produce only one pot — albeit a perfect one — to get an “A”.  Well, came grading time and a curious fact emerged: the works of highest quality were all produced by the group being graded for quantity.  It seems that while the “quantity” group was busily churning out piles of work — and learning from their mistakes — the “quality” group had sat theorizing about perfection, and in the end had little more to show for their efforts than grandiose theories and a pile of dead clay. In photography, I think this same idea is true. You can read, watch videos, and theorize about what makes a great photograph, but getting out there and taking photos for practice is actually the best way to learn. Don’t be afraid that the photos you’re creating aren’t good enough.  Instead, just get out there and create “quantity.” You’ll find a lot more success by playing with your camera, trying new things, and making mistakes than you ever will by leaving your camera on the shelf. Share on Facebook

[Editor’s Note: Learn more about how you can turn your pictures into cash in our free online newsletter The Right Way to Travel.  Sign up here today and we’ll send you a new report, Selling Photos for Cash: A Quick-Start Guide, completely FREE.]

Pin It on Pinterest

[i]
[i]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[160]
[160]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[email]
[email]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[email]
[email]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[160]
[160]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[36]
[36]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[160]
[160]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[i]
[i]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[email]
[email]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[160]
[160]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[36]
[36]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[160]
[160]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[email]
[email]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[160]
[160]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[36]
[36]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[160]
[160]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]