********************* The Right Way to Travel October 29, 2009 – “Better Holiday Photos” Tip #2 ********************* Yesterday I sent you some tips for taking better photos at Halloween. Today, let’s talk Turkey Day… with three tips for professional-looking Thanksgiving photos, taken from our Holiday Photo Guide: ** 1. Choose a subject and let it dominate the image. Instead of shooting random photographs in hopes of catching something good, pick out your subject and try to find creative ways to capture it. For instance, maybe your great-aunt has flown into town for the holiday. Get a shot of her stirring the gravy or sitting in a chair with your 2-year-old on her lap. ** 2. Capture the spirit of the season. Thanksgiving is about family and togetherness. While the roast turkey traditionally symbolizes the holiday, the bird takes on even greater meaning when surrounded by your loved ones. Snap some photos of the family at the dining room table, just before the carving of the turkey. It’s okay to give stage directions: instruct everyone to look at the bird, to hold their glass in a toast, etc. But you’ll probably want to avoid taking pictures of people eating; they’re usually not flattering. ** 3. Try a different perspective. Many amateur photographers make the mistake of shooting most photos from a head-on, eye-level position. Changing your position can dramatically alter the impact of a photo. Experiment with each subject to see which perspective works best. When photographing the dining-room table, for instance, you might try shooting from the foot of the table in a standing position — and again while standing on a stool. You may also want to get some shots from the head of the table, capturing looks of expectation as everyone eyes the still-intact turkey. BONUS TIP: If your family members don’t mind signing model releases, you might be able to sell your Halloween, Thanksgiving, Christmas, and other “special event” photos online as stock. Stock photo legend, Lise Gagne, takes holiday photos to sell as stock every year. She suggests that to sell seasonal photos, you should think ahead… because designers look for holiday images three months in advance. So hold on to your best Thanksgiving shots, and upload them for sale in stock agencies next August. And consider taking Valentine-themed photos now. — Bonnie Bonnie Caton Editorial Manager, Great Escape Publishing [Editor’s Note: Learn more about how you can turn your pictures into cash in our free online newsletter The Right Way to Travel.  Sign up here today and we’ll send you a new report, Selling Photos for Cash: A Quick-Start Guide, completely FREE.]  

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