Discover the right way to travel.

Imagine yourself on the trip of your dreams: a palm-ringed island, the beauty and history of Paris, the intoxicating allure of the Napa Valley. Now imagine that with only a pen, a camera and a little curiosity, all of these incredible travel destinations are within your reach.

Sign up today for Great Escape’s free newsletter, The Right Way to Travel, and you’ll learn how to get the most out of every trip – and how to get paid to do it.

Simply enter your name and email address in the form below and you’ll receive your first issue, along with our Five Fun Ways to Get Paid to Travel quick-start guide, absolutely free. Inside, you’ll find 5 exciting opportunities for earning extra income while exploring cities around the globe. It’s your first step to a life of fun and freedom.

Fill out the form today and you’ll be one step closer to a new part- or full-time income that can help you realize your travel dreams. And don’t worry – we will never rent, sell or give away your email address for any reason. We’ll see you out there!









Just a couple of days into my new life as an expat in Uruguay, I was having lunch on the patio of a restaurant in Punta del Este. I had ordered by pointing to an item on the menu that I imagined was a large Italian-style salad… Ten minutes later, however, the waiter set a large glass serving bowl of sliced beets in front of me.

“Okay,” I thought to myself, “time to get serious about learning Spanish…”

Knowing Spanish in Uruguay has helped me to learn about Uruguay’s culture. For example, Uruguay has more social formalities than in the U.S. Linguistically they maintain the formal form of “you” and familiar forms of “you” for friends and family.

People usually don’t greet strangers on the street. If one does approach a stranger, say, to ask street directions, they will first indicate they have a question to ask, or request a consultation before stating the question.

At the same time, once a relationship develops, such as becoming a regular customer, neighbor, or friend, Uruguayans are very warm. They stand close together, touch a lot, and greet their friends and coworkers with a kiss on the cheek.

I know enough Spanish to get by and have several bilingual friends. However, I am discovering a new drive to push forward in my Spanish studies, for the interesting people and situations I have ahead of me in this precious little country called Uruguay.

[Editor’s Note: Learn more about opportunities to profit from your travels (and even from your own home) in our free online newsletter The Right Way to Travel.]

[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[email]
[email]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[160]
[160]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[custom_fields]
[36]
[36]