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You know what I like about the South Korean culture? Respect is implied. They believe please and thank you should always be in your heart.  It doesn’t need to be said out loud. Having just returned home from crazy Independence Day travel, I wish this were true here in the U.S. I wish that every bump in the airplane loading line was an unintentional accident and “oops, I’m sorry” was already implied.  That the person eating pretzels next to me wouldn’t have to cover her mouth and nearly choke to spit out a thank you when I lean to grab her fallen napkin. And that, by merely demonstrating caution with our actions, our sorries and excuse-me’s are implied. Maybe simply going about our day with a smile on our face and respect in our heart, we could get by with fewer forced politenesses, pardon-me’s, and excuses. And, if we pass that idea around, they’ll be expected less, too. Ideally, the airport, loading dock, street traffic, and crowds will legitimately feel happier and better respected, too. By simply saying less pleases and thank you’s and implying more, we’d all become happier. Are please and thank you necessary if we can all be more respectful in our actions? I’d love your thoughts. Please leave a comment below. Share on Facebook [Editor’s Note: Learn more about opportunities to profit from your travels (and even from your own home) in our free online newsletter The Right Way to Travel.  Sign up today here and we’ll send you a report, Get Paid to Travel as a Travel Writer, completely FREE.]

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