Before we get into the Photoshop vs. Lightroom debate, let me explain what I do for a living… The majority of my work these days includes two types of photography: stock and portraiture. After a portrait photo shoot, my process includes: 1. Uploading the images to my computer and processing them in either Photoshop or Lightroom (to adjust lighting, color, and contrast). 2. Fixing little details like acne or wrinkles, so that my client looks 10 times better than she thinks she does. 3. Preparing the files for print — including some cropping and size adjustments. For stock photography, my workflow is similar, but with some important exceptions… Firstly, I need to edit out any visible signs or logos. Secondly, I need to avoid technical problems that might occur through my editing. (While these may go unnoticed by my portrait client, my stock client is more particular.) Personally, I find both programs useful. Here’s why…

Photoshop Tip: The Difference Between Photoshop and Lightroom

To appreciate the differences between Lightroom and Photoshop, I like to think about it this way: Lightroom = global change Photoshop = targeted change To fix something specific within an image (remove a logo, fix a wrinkle, brighten dark circles under my client’s eyes, etc.), I have to use Photoshop. But, when I want to apply a change to the entire photograph (convert it to black and white, crop, adjust the color saturation, etc.), I prefer to use Lightroom. Why? Well… even though I can make my global changes in Photoshop, Lightroom is often faster and easier. While I may have to finish my editing in Photoshop, it can cut my workflow time by at least a half to start processing in Lightroom. When you’re working with 30 to 40 images at once, that’s a huge time-saver. Lightroom also catalogs all my images, keywords them, adds my copyright info, and makes them super easy to sort, rate, and find. You can do some of that in Photoshop, too, but it’s time consuming. With Lightroom, when my client requests reprints, I can pull up his photos in a matter of minutes. It recalls the location of the photo on my computer and remembers everything I did to process that image before printing. You don’t get that with Photoshop. So, in my line of work, I find it helpful to combine the best of both programs. If you’re shooting for stock or portraits, I suggest you do the same. ENTER TO WIN! This month’s photo challenge theme is “Let’s Go Green.”  If you have a picture to submit, log on to our website and click on the “Enter to Win” tab.  (Note: First-time users need to register on the “register” link on the right side bar first. Once you have a username and password, click “Enter to Win” to upload your photo. Only one photo per applicant will be considered. No purchase necessary to register.) Photos are due by 8:00 a.m. EST, Monday, March 24, 2008. [Editor’s Note: Learn more about how you can turn your pictures into cash in our free online newsletter The Right Way to Travel.  Sign up here today and we’ll send you a new report, Selling Photos for Cash: A Quick-Start Guide, completely FREE.]

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